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Tree stand placement.

PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2015 6:25 am
by hubtech
I'm still pretty green to all this... I've used a climbing stand the last two seasons, but find that when I use it, I never see deer. What sort of spots should I look for when using a climber? How high? Is a stand skirt worth anything?


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Re: Tree stand placement.

PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2015 7:18 am
by gtk
#1 most important thing, is USE a safety harness..

In early bowseason, I like to find a persimmon tree & set up real close to it.. If no persimmons, look for some acorns. If you aren't seeing deer after a couple sits, the nice thing about the climber is you can move easy enough..

If you are climbing & hunting that same morn, try to make as little noise as possible.. Even better, hang the stand the eve before so all you have to do is climb the next am (no limbs to trim etc)

Re: Tree stand placement.

PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2015 7:39 am
by hubtech
Good call. Always wear a harness. Mama did t raise no fool


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Tree stand placement.

PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2015 9:21 am
by triple_duece
I hunt/scout a little different. Doesn't mean my method is best it just works for me.

First of all, do your scouting in February. This unfolds the true picture for placement the following year. Mark likely trees to hunt from in gps. The following year you have many spots to hunt without disturbing the area. I don't like going in and putting my stand up before the hunt as I believe it tips some deer off. If I know the tree in climbing I will go when I hunt. Often I go in blind and find a tree in the dark without knowing the area. I have to say my success is higher than any other method. I think it's because it was undisturbed an no scent was dropped by a human.

If you don't have any spots to hunt, here is some keys areas to look for. First would be transition areas or edges. Anywhere the woods of topo changes are a good start. There are also feeding areas and bedding areas. Bedding areas are gonna be the thickest area around. Sometimes it's on the edge of a swamp or some type of water, areas that have been cut and is a thicket or a thick ridge near the top of a hill.

Feeding areas can be ag, food plots, oak trees and soft mast trees.

Evenings are usually better for feeding areas. Mornings are usually better for transition areas going back to bedding.

As for a skirt for climber I'd say no because it makes your profile even worse. As for how high, I get as high to be able to see best and have some cover from the second story in the woods. Try to hunt the best wind direction as you can. Deer come from all directions so success is usually 60% of not getting winded. Try to set up where your on the shaded side of the tree if possible. Ask more questions and I will try to help.

Tree stand placement.

PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2015 9:29 am
by triple_duece
If your hunting public land, the hard to get to areas are best. People are lazy, use this to your advantage. If it's easy most likely hunters are doing it and success drops.

If hunting private land it's better to pattern the members than deer. Do the opposite of the members as the deer have been patterning the hunters for years. Most lease hunters don't hunt out of portable stands and over hunt the permanent stands to no end. Don't focus on plots and hunt in the woods looking for trails going to the plot. Remember most deer will enter from the downwind side if possible, especially older aged bucks and won't hit the plot till dark thirty.

Re: Tree stand placement.

PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2015 7:07 pm
by bigsteve
There are many variations of set ups first and foremost is wind ( rember the wind is your friend ) deticate your self to hunting the wind always keep the wind on your nose . And no matter how good the sign is do not hunt when the wind is wrong forget about magic scent killers a hunter that tells me he believes in scent killers tells me he does not hunt the perfect set up always approach your set up down wind and never hunt more than 2 sets at one given time now
Hunting food ( acorns) learn your acorn types what the tree and the acorns look like early season (October )red oak , and live oaks fall first red oaks look for 1- tracks 2- fresh crap 3- busted acorns (usually halves) live oaks you usually won't find busted acorns the deer will usually eat these whole
Muscadines , persimmon and honey locusts look for tracks and crap
White oaks (November) these are the sweetest a acorns deer love them a lot of times they will feed exclusively on these acorns
Transition areas look for well used ( deer trails) with fresh tracks in them look to see witch way the tracks are going to food evening to cover morning WeTher this works or not it's a place to start I try to pick a location were the trail turns that way on a wind shift sometimes won't get you busted if you have more specific questions just ask good luck

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